Yearly Archives: 2015

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The Revelation of Jesus Christ

“The Revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave Him to show His servants—things which must shortly take place. And He sent and signified it by His angel to His servant John” (Rev 1:1)

The Greek word for “revelation,” in Revelation, literally means to uncover or unveil something previously hidden; it can be translated “appearing.” Revelation is an important way we receive knowledge of the divine. For Christians, our faith is founded upon Christ’s revelation in the Scriptures (Lk 24:27; Jn 5:39, 46). So our very gospel of salvation hangs upon divine revelation (Gal 1:11f). Even our hope, in Christ’s future return, is called “revelation,” expressing the idea of Christ’s “appearing” (1 Cor 1:7; 2 Thess 1:7; 1 Pet 1:13).

Despite its importance as a concept, the word “revelation” itself only occurs once in the entire book of Revelation. Revelation 1:1 says “The Revelation of Jesus Christ…”

At the core, biblical revelation has to do with knowing the truth and the source of it. Sadly, many people today prefer the lie over the truth. Continue reading

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A King Centered Life

Praise be to the Lord our God, who is the King of kings and Lord of lords.

For most of us living in the western world and even in the increasingly secularized parts of the world in Asia, we have this thinking that there is no one above us. So we do not know what it is like to have someone be our ruler. Even in the UK there is a queen, but people treat her as a representation of the country rather than someone to whom they swear allegiance. Those who do become part of the nation may make an oath, but the majority of the time, such swearing is not taken too seriously after receiving citizenship. Most do what is right in their own eyes (cf. Judg 21:25) and at most conform to the law to avoid getting penalized or expelled. Aside from the minimal conformity, few would live life revolving around an individual in power.

When we apply this to our faith, it is a revelation. On closer examination, we may discover that there is a discrepancy between what we believe and how we live. Continue reading

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Why Going to Church Is Important to Me: Part I

Preface

I’ve been going to church pretty much every week ever since I was a baby. Naturally, attending Sabbath services was and still is a very regular part of my life. Sometimes I find it odd when people ask me what my plans are for the weekend, because for me, 50% of it is always the same thing. “Well on Saturday I’ll be at church most of the day, as per yooj, and on Sunday…I’m not really sure yet.”

Whenever something becomes routine and repetitive, it can start to feel ritualistic, and at times even meaningless. Church is no exception. I, and perhaps many others, often feel that I go to church simply because it’s just what I do, and I’ve always been taught that I should. Even when it feels like a drag, I still go almost purely out of obligation stemming from either myself, or from responsibilities I have at church.

When this happens, it’s natural (and good) for us to re-evaluate Continue reading

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Faith Was Found in Nineveh

The title of this post may seem peculiar because we hardly think of Nineveh, a metropolitan city of Assyria, being full of faith. They worshipped foreign gods, did not believe in God, and were so wicked that their wickedness came up before God (Jon 1:2)! Even the king of Nineveh himself admitted that the people were evil and that violence was in their hands (Jon 3:8b). How could such a city, great as it was, have faith in God?

“[Jonah] cried out and said, ‘Yet forty days, and Nineveh shall be overthrown!’  (Jon 3:4)

Perhaps there was more to God’s message. But all we see recorded is that Jonah basically proclaimed that Nineveh was doomed; that they were condemned already. If we were to hear such a message today, how would we respond? Continue reading

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Walking in the Light

“Then Jesus spoke to them again, saying, ‘I am the light of the world. He who follows Me shall not walk in darkness, but have the light of life.’ ” (Jn 8:12)

Light represents goodness, purity, holiness, and truth. Darkness represents sin, evil, and Satan. As the light of the world, Jesus brings light to mankind. When we follow Jesus Christ, the light of the world, we can avoid walking blindly and falling into sin. Confession of our sins restores our fellowship with God. Walking in the light is the key to having fellowship with God and experiencing intimacy with Him.

Practically speaking, what does it mean to “walk in the light” and not “in darkness”? Continue reading